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Why nuclear talks with Iran will fail again PDF Print

Kayvan Kaboli, 23 Feb. 2013

On the tenth anniversary of nuclear talks between Europe troika and Iran it is wise to evaluate ten years of futile negotiations and understand the reasons for this failure that lies primarily in Tehran and not in Washington.

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The next round of nuclear talks between Iran and P5+1 is set for February 26 and the majority of experts predict a new session of vain talks for no result. As usual, the pro-appeasement circles in Washington campaign hard to blame the US and its European allies for this failure and argue that Western demands are excessive and their concessions insufficient to merit a serious response from Tehran.

On the tenth anniversary of nuclear talks between Europe troika and Iran it is wise to evaluate ten years of futile negotiations and understand the reasons for this failure that lies primarily in Tehran and not in Washington.

There are many reasons for the Iranian intransigence but the White House former WMD czar Gary Samore who has a realistic view of Iranian regime had correctly pointed to a fundamental factor that explains Iranian behavior. During a speech at Woodrow Wilson center on January 11th, 2008, Dr. Samore declared:

"There is no doubt that there is some people in Iran who would see the kind of incentives the US could put on the table as attractive. But I think the significant part of Iran's power establishment who would find those kinds of carrots to be very unattractive. They would be poisoned carrots because they (Iranian leaders) build their political situation on hostility with the US. And for them, a better relation with US represents a cultural clash and will also weaken their domestic political position."

The Washington Institute expert Patrick Clawson has also explained another reason for the Iranian behavior:

 “Political infighting in Tehran is so bad that Iran might not be able to bring itself to accept unilateral U.S. unconditional surrender were it to be offered…Iranian leaders fight about everything, even where vital national security interests are at stake…By their actions, Iranian leaders are giving the strong impression that they are so preoccupied by their internal differences that they cannot agree on, well, a damn thing.